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Guiding Questions for Using CORE Districts’ Benchmarking Data

By |2019-05-20T10:05:23-04:00May 20, 2019|

Practitioners can use CORE benchmarking data to target resources and supports needed most within their schools and districts. Benchmark data can be used to illuminate strengths within and across schools or grade-levels in order to help identify and scale promising practices; it can help leaders and administrators identify disparities in SE development in order to inform resource allocation; and, it can be used to prioritize student SE development goals and set priorities for the year.  We recommend that you use following set of questions to help guide your use of the CORE benchmark data to unpack your own students’ social-emotional survey data.

SEL: Not a Moment, but a Movement

By |2019-05-15T11:12:57-04:00May 15, 2019|

On May 1, more than 300 educators, researchers, and policymakers gathered for the inaugural exSEL Network conference, titled Social-Emotional Learning: Lessons Learned and Opportunities for Massachusetts, led by Transforming Education, the Rennie Center, and SEL4MA. Participants took part in breakout sessions focused on learning from the experiences of districts putting social-emotional learning policies and practices into place and hearing from experts about SEL supports and strategies.

Global Outreach from Your Seat

By |2019-04-22T15:33:00-04:00April 23, 2019|

“What will your students remember in five years?” was a question asked during one of our professional learning sessions with Transforming Education. Usually when you recall a memory, you associate it with a certain emotion - whether that is happiness, sadness, excitement, or anger. When building lessons for our novels this year, I wanted to focus on that question in my 7th grade English class. What will my students remember from this? What could I teach that would build a deeper connection to their own emotions? That is how I came up with this unexpected yet rewarding experience.

Stop, Collaborate and Listen

By |2019-04-05T15:10:52-04:00April 8, 2019|

Young. Gifted. Black. I remember as a youth hearing others speak of me as an intellectual but completely rough around the edges.  The truth was, I was a high risk student by all measures - I grew up in an impoverished one-parent household in a rough inner city neighborhood where some temptations swallowed other boys like me.  I survived, but by all measures I probably shouldn’t be where I am today - excelling as a successful father, husband, and educator. How did I do it?

A Student’s Experience with Social-Emotional Learning at Idaho’s One Stone

By |2019-03-11T14:53:11-04:00January 29, 2019|

Growing up, I was the epitome of a cookie-cutter kid. I excelled in school, getting straight A´s throughout the entirety of my elementary and junior high career. I played soccer and basketball, participated in track and field, and did triathlons. I became obsessed with trying to be perfect. For all of my time in junior high, I became preoccupied with a trophy that was given out to students with a cumulative GPA of 4.0. I stopped at nothing to get that award and at the time it seemed like it mattered more to me than anything else. Now, that trophy is sitting under my bed collecting dust. Don’t get me wrong -- I am proud of how hard I worked to accomplish what I did. However, after taking a huge leap of faith, my entire view of what success looks and feels like drastically changed.

Supporting our Trans, Non-binary, and Gender Non-Conforming Students through Mindfulness and an Anti-Oppression Framework

By |2019-01-16T09:47:42-04:00January 11, 2019|

Jersey Cosantino, teacher and student of mindfulness studies, explores the ways that educators can offer mindfulness through an anti-oppression lens to our transgender, non-binary, and gender non-conforming students. By integrating mindfulness practice and anti-oppression work, educators can offer students an additional tool to build resilience and foster positive-emotional well being.

Bridging Research & Practice to Expand the Definition of Student Success

By |2019-01-06T18:51:53-04:00January 6, 2019|

A large and growing body of research demonstrates that success in life requires both academic and social-emotional skills. When young people develop these interconnected sets of competencies, they are more likely to be healthy, engaged in their communities, financially secure, and empowered to pursue goals of their own choosing. Inspired by this body of research, Transforming Education (TransformEd) and NewSchools Venture Fund (NewSchools) have embarked on a multi-year partnership to support schools in expanding their definition of student success to include academics, social-emotional competencies, and the positive learning environments that support students’ development in both of these domains.

Opportunity, Agency, and the First Steps to a Life of Purpose

By |2019-01-04T13:48:19-04:00December 14, 2018|

Purpose in life might seem like a lofty goal for students, but it provides a host of benefits for adolescents, such as psychological wellbeing, physical health, hopefulness for the future, and satisfaction with life. Young people with purpose are goal-directed and have aspirations that drive them forward in life and help organize their planning for the future. At the Stanford Center on Adolescence, we define purpose as a personally meaningful aspiration to do something that makes a positive contribution to the world beyond-the-self.

Reflections from the Society of Research on Child Development’s special topic session

By |2018-11-28T10:40:38-04:00November 28, 2018|

We recently had the opportunity to attend SRCD’s special topic session: Promoting Character Development Among Diverse Children and Adolescents. The conference touched on many things we, here at TransformEd, believe in deeply and work to integrate not only into our work with educators but also into our own lives, as parents to little ones.

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