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Define Respect

By |2019-10-15T08:42:55-04:00October 15, 2019|

When we as teachers teach by example, our students become more engaged and can witness the process at work. This simple assignment, meant to stretch my students, also challenged me. I reflected on my practice, and it helped our school level biases. When students have the agency to problem solve, it also opens the doors for us as teachers to lend to the process. When we think about the many ways to impact change in the daily educational experience, we often forget those voices who are being educated. When asked, my students thought critically about change and learned how to advocate in the process. Their voices were valuable in the conversation to improve education, instructional procedures, and operations.

Growth Mindset in the Math Classroom

By |2019-10-02T11:53:07-04:00October 1, 2019|

When my grade 9 math students ask me when they are going to use the skills of graphing lines or solving systems of equations in their daily lives, my honest answer is that, depending on what they decide to do in life, they might not. But, I explain, I hope

Making Sense of Students’ Social-Emotional Competencies Based on Teacher Reports and SELweb Scores

By |2019-08-06T20:17:31-04:00August 6, 2019|

Transforming Education (TransformEd) has been working with NewSchools Venture Fund on a multi-year project to assist schools in expanding their definition of student success to include academics, social-emotional competencies, and positive learning environments that support students’ development. As part of this project, TransformEd provides school leaders with

Guiding Questions for Using CORE Districts’ Benchmarking Data

By |2019-05-20T10:05:23-04:00May 20, 2019|

Practitioners can use CORE benchmarking data to target resources and supports needed most within their schools and districts. Benchmark data can be used to illuminate strengths within and across schools or grade-levels in order to help identify and scale promising practices; it can help leaders and administrators identify disparities in SE development in order to inform resource allocation; and, it can be used to prioritize student SE development goals and set priorities for the year.  We recommend that you use following set of questions to help guide your use of the CORE benchmark data to unpack your own students’ social-emotional survey data.

SEL: Not a Moment, but a Movement

By |2019-05-15T11:12:57-04:00May 15, 2019|

On May 1, more than 300 educators, researchers, and policymakers gathered for the inaugural exSEL Network conference, titled Social-Emotional Learning: Lessons Learned and Opportunities for Massachusetts, led by Transforming Education, the Rennie Center, and SEL4MA. Participants took part in breakout sessions focused on learning from the experiences of districts putting social-emotional learning policies and practices into place and hearing from experts about SEL supports and strategies.

Global Outreach from Your Seat

By |2019-04-22T15:33:00-04:00April 23, 2019|

“What will your students remember in five years?” was a question asked during one of our professional learning sessions with Transforming Education. Usually when you recall a memory, you associate it with a certain emotion - whether that is happiness, sadness, excitement, or anger. When building lessons for our novels this year, I wanted to focus on that question in my 7th grade English class. What will my students remember from this? What could I teach that would build a deeper connection to their own emotions? That is how I came up with this unexpected yet rewarding experience.

Stop, Collaborate and Listen

By |2019-04-05T15:10:52-04:00April 8, 2019|

Young. Gifted. Black. I remember as a youth hearing others speak of me as an intellectual but completely rough around the edges.  The truth was, I was a high risk student by all measures - I grew up in an impoverished one-parent household in a rough inner city neighborhood where some temptations swallowed other boys like me.  I survived, but by all measures I probably shouldn’t be where I am today - excelling as a successful father, husband, and educator. How did I do it?

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