Stephanie

About Stephanie Hurley

Stephanie Hurley is the Director of Partnerships at Transforming Education, where she facilitates the integration of social-emotional learning into practice in schools and districts by designing and leading professional learning series, helping educators use data to inform their practice and policies, and working as thought partner with school leaders on SEL strategy, vision, and implementation. Previously, Stephanie was a Content Specialist at Achievement Network, a strategy consultant with the Boston Schools Fund, and a middle school literacy teacher and Humanities Data Leader at the Academy of the Pacific Rim charter public school in Boston. Stephanie holds a B.A. in Secondary Education and English from Boston College and an M.B.A. in Nonprofit Management from Brandeis University.

SEL Integration Approach: Teacher Self-Check Tool

By |2019-08-20T21:06:28-05:00August 20, 2019|

The Teacher Self-Check Tool is designed as a formative, rather than an evaluative, tool that can help classroom teachers reflect on their own practice. It walks teachers through the six components of strong SEL Integration and provides "look-fors," or key elements, for each component. Thinking about these elements can help teachers identify which components they are already prioritizing, determine where they want to focus their efforts, and plan for next steps. The goal of the Teacher Self-Check Tool is to help educators build their own awareness about different ways to approach SEL in the classroom and be even more intentional about providing holistic supports to students. This tool is intended to be used in conjunction with Transforming Education’s SEL Integration Approach.

Improvement Science and MESH

By |2017-11-01T11:10:57-05:00November 1, 2017|

Over the past six months, I’ve had the great pleasure of traveling to districts across the country to speak with and learn from our new school partners who are committed to integrating important Mindsets, Essential Skills, and Habits (MESH), such as growth mindset and social awareness, into their daily practice. At the start of most of these engagements, educators tend to ask me one question more than any other: “Where do we begin?”